List Of Shame: The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring (Extended Edition, 2001)

The third entry in my List Of Shame has to have the longest end credits of all time!

Screenplay By: Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson, & Fran Walsh
Directed By: Peter Jackson

I can’t tell you how the extended edition of The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring compares to the theatrical edition, I wish I could, but I simply can’t. I haven’t seen the theatrical version of The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring since it was showing in theaters. I remembered bits and pieces of the film, enough to know I had quite liked what I saw, but not enough for me to recognize the extra footage and scenes added to this version of The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring. My fiancee was able to, but that doesn’t impact my view of what I saw when I watched the extended edition. Why am I telling you all of this, you ask? I want the people reading what I am typing to know that I went into the extended edition of The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring very fresh and that my view of this version of the film was not colored by the theatrical version.

With that bit of tedium out of the way, where do I begin to discuss The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring? The easiest place to begin is in the type of tale that is The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring, a grand adventure. It may be easy to lose sight of that fact, what with the attention to detail and tiny moments of real emotion that propel said tale. The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring is a grand adventure tale in the mold of classic adventure films but with more of an emphasis on story and characters. The world of the film isn’t just filled with characters from a book, it’s filled with diverse creations who make a fantastic world fully come to life.

The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring is not as swashbuckling as The Adventures Of Robin Hood, but I thought of that movie a lot while watching this one. The Adventures Of Robin Hood is lighter and more intent on simple fun, while The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring is darker and more intent on small moments of fun amidst great happenings. Mr. Jackson has weaved elements from The Adventures Of Robin Hood, and other films, into his own epic adventure. When the Orcs are on the move my heart began to race, when Boromir made his stand I was at the edge of my seat. It can be derided as simplistic, but The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring moves beyond the realm of such labels and into the territory of pure unadulterated adventure and fun.

A key element in the acceptance of the tale The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring wants to tell is its effects. There were but a few moments where the effects were of a less than stellar level, the escape from Moria for instance. Those flawed moments were easily pushed to the side by outstanding practical and visual effects. The Balrog inside of Moria is simply amazing, yet the Hobbits are the most bewildering effect of all. It surprised me how easily I was able to accept the actors playing the Hobbits as little people. I had to keep reminding myself that Elijah Wood is in fact a full grown man, and that is a testament to the brilliance of the effects in in The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring.

At the same time effects couldn’t overcome an unrealistic landscape, but luckily for The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring New Zealand made an outstanding Middle-earth. I could never tell what was a well designed set and what was a real New Zealand landscape. There are sweeping shots of grandeur throughout The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring, and those shots could have been the death knell of the picture if not for the fact that the landscape was so stunning and realistic. In particular, the creation of the Elven dwelling where the Fellowship is formed was stunning in its detail. Look, I know I’ve used a lot of hyperbole in this paragraph, but if there is one area where hyperbole can be freely used it is in the world that Peter Jackson created in The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring.

I don’t know if I went in-depth enough in my review, I’m not quite sure if my written words properly conveyed the joy I felt while watching the extended edition of The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring. That’s the problem with the feeling of joy, it fills one up in such a way that is often hard to express through any means. I don’t want people to misconstrue what I am saying, I know that The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring isn’t a perfect movie, it’s not even in my top five for the year of its release. That doesn’t take away from the movie though, it is a finely crafted film, and it’s also a thrilling adventure. I’m always up for a thrilling adventure, especially one that is full of vibrant and interesting characters. The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring is a spectacle, it is an adventure, it is a drama, it is an action film. The extended edition of The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring is many things, but I’m happiest to be able to say that it is a movie I have experienced.

Rating:

****

Cheers,
Bill

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4 responses to “List Of Shame: The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring (Extended Edition, 2001)

  1. Mark Middlemas

    I believe this to be the best of the series. There I said it.

  2. I have extremely fond memories of The Two Towers, and I remember liking Return Of The King a lot, but thinking that the multiple endings were way too much. In summation, we shall see my friend. 🙂

  3. I haven’t seen this film in a few years, so I’m not sure if the special effects have held up. Still, glad you liked it and look forward to hearing what you think about the rest of the films.

    It’s one of those grand adventures we get so rarely in films nowadays.

  4. I think the effects held up rather well, there were only a few instances where they looked bad.

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