30 Day Film Challenge: Day 22 – Your Favorite Horror Film: The Shining (1980)

It was inevitable that a Stanley Kubrick film would show up during the challenge, inevitable I say!

Day 22 – Your Favorite Horror Film

The Shining (1980, Stanley Kubrick)

It all begins with the score, that’s followed by the camera, together these create a wonderfully foreboding atmosphere. Horror doesn’t always need to be about the scare, or the jump out, or anything that people traditionally associate with horror. The Shining came near the end of a time period that I consider a small revolution within horror, when directors were attempting to tell horror tales in as many different ways as possible. The approach The Shining takes to telling a horror tale is to leave all the traditional horror elements behind. Instead Mr. Kubrick focuses on absurd moments and a sense of dread that never leaves the screen. There’s very little suspense to be found in The Shining, but there is plenty of atmosphere, because horror is many things and atmosphere is certainly one of them.

Cheers,
Bill

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6 responses to “30 Day Film Challenge: Day 22 – Your Favorite Horror Film: The Shining (1980)

  1. A great horror film that is all about the atmosphere and what an atmosphere that Kurbrick creates. Good Review!

  2. Thanks, and you are spot on about Kubrick and atmosphere, The Shining is but one of many films where he creates such great atmosphere.

  3. Mark Middlemas

    For me the weirdest moment is the dude in the bunny suit and friend. The look those two give her…

  4. When I first reviewed The Shining I did make sure to mention that scene, it is super creepy.

  5. One of the finest horror flicks for sure and it’s got fantastic atmosphere.

    What’s always impressed me about the film is how almost all the film takes place in well-lit corridors instead of the usual unlit and dark spaces that permeate the horror genre.

  6. I think the well lit corridors helped to add to the vastness of the hotel. Too much dark and the place would have felt unfinished with corridors that abruptly stopped because of darkness. The well lit nature of the picture actually added to the sense of claustrophobia I got from the picture, a person can see how long these corridors are and that makes the way the hotel is pressing down upon the characters much more weighty.

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